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  1. How PCOS Impacts Hair Growth, Skin and Acne

    While PCOS impacts how we feel inside, many people first notice the physical symptoms of the condition. These include changes to their hair and skin, like acne, pigmentation, hair growth and hair loss. 

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  2. 4 Ways to Support your Hormone Levels with PCOS

    If you have PCOS, you’ve no doubt been told you need to ‘balance your hormones’. While hormonal dysregulation is both a symptom and a cause of the condition, the phrase isn’t exactly a scientific way to communicate complex systems.

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  3. Exercise for PCOS: how yoga can support your hormone health

     

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  4. PCOS Workouts: Why Low-Impact Exercise is So Good for Your Hormones

    We all know that moving our bodies is so important for our health. While social media and the buzzing fitness industry have made intense exercise that leaves you huffing and puffing in a sweat-drenched ball seem like the best way to move, that’s not true for everyone.

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  5. What Does The Women's Health Strategy Mean For PCOS & Endometriosis?

    In July the government published its first ever Women’s Health Strategy for England (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/womens-health-strategy-for-england/womens-health-strategy-for-england), following a public consultation that attracted more than 100,000 responses. This was a landmark moment in itself – an acknowledgement that women’s health has long been neglected, and a first step towards changing that. But what does the strategy actually mean for women with PCOS and other reproductive health issues?

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  6. PCOS and caffeine: should you avoid tea and coffee?

    Tea and coffee are part of most people’s lives, whether you love the ritual of making your morning pot or just down it to get through tiring days. But people with PCOS are frequently told to avoid or reduce their intake of caffeinated drinks.

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